Ballade Stanza

A Ballade Stanza or Monk’s Tale Stanza (So named because it was used in  the Monk’s Tale in The Canterbury Tales (1386–1400) by Geoffrey Chaucer )
Is an ten syllable isosyllabic octave, usually written in conjunction with other stanzas (formally five stressed syllables)
Rhyme Scheme: ababbcbc
Example Poem
Reprieve      (Ballade Stanza)
My puppy wasn’t there when I got home
which was unusual in every way.
He’d always wait to play; he’d never roam.
“Honey- my grandma had sad things to say,
“Hit chasing car… then they took him away.”
I’d never cried the way I cried that night.
Surprise! His leg was in a cast next day;
the driver smiled and made my life alright.
© Lawrencealot – January 16, 2014

 

Visual Template

Strambotto

The Strambotto has three primary versions:
All are presented here.
The Siciliano,  rhymed abababab
The Tuscano,  rhymed ababccdd (preferred), abababcc,  aabbccdd
and the Romagnuolo, rhymed ababccdd
It is:
Lyrical – Written as one octave, or with the Tuscano, possibly one sestet.  It you wish to write several stanza it becomes an Ottava Rima.
Rhymed – Each with its specific pattern(s).
Isosyllabic – Each line has precisely eleven syllables.
Below are additional resources with history and added information.  At the end you will find my Visual Templates.
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Strambotto
This was an early form of Italian poetry that was set to music by composers of the frottola and madrigals of the 16th century. The poetry is set into very strict stanzas of eight lines of eleven syllables. This type of stanza is known as rispetto or ottava rima. The musical rispetto was usualy dedicated to a lady love, Aside from the fact the ottava rima had no set form length and later became Iambic it also came from literature and generally had multiple stanzas, but musical version, the strambotto was typically created with a single stanza.
There are three basic types of strambotto and they are identified by their rhyme scheme.
1. Strambotto Siciliano
It will be noted that this is similar to the Sicilian Octave, but follows the Strombotto rules and consists of eight strict hendecasyllable lines (11 syllables), and similarly for multi stanzas.
a. b. a. b. a. b. a. b. 
2. Strambotto Toscano
This form is most used for stand alone poetry, but can be used for multiple stanzas. When writing muliple stanzas (as in a song), it is usual to link each stanza by either a refrain or using the whole or part of the last line of the previous stanza as the first line of the next stanza:
a. b. a. b. a. b. c. c. 
3. Strambotto Romagnuolo
This form has the octave constructed from a Sicilian quatrain and a quatrain of two couplets. The same rules apply about stand alone poems, and multiple stanzas.
a. b. a. b. c. c. d. d
My thanks to the poetsgarret.
The Strambotto is thought to have influenced the development of the Sicilian Octave and the birth of the sonnet. The Strambotto is one of the earliest Italian verse forms and can be found in works from the 12th through the 19th centuries usually set to music. The name comes from the Occitan,estrabot which refers to sentimental and or amorous rhymes. Sources suggest the early Strambotto varied between 6 or 8 lines long however it was eventually recognized as an 8 line form holding fast to a strict 11 syllable line. Rhyme seems to be delineated by territory, Tuscan, Sicilian and Romano. The frame appears to be the same as the Ottavo Rima Stanza. However, the forms are quite different in that the Strombotto is limited to a single lyrical, octave while the Ottavo Rima is a narrative, stanzaic verse written with any number of octaves. 
 IN ADDITION THE OTTAVO RIMA may be decasyllabic LARRY
The Strambotto is:
  • lyrical.
  • an octastich, a poem in 8 lines. (When written in narrative stanzas it is better known as Ottava Rima)
  • syllabic, strict hendecasyllabic lines. In English it has been found in iambic pentameter.
  • rhymed, most often follows the Tuscan patterns of abababcc and occasionally aabbccdd and is sometimes called Strambotto Tuscano. TheSicilian Strambottos followed the rhyme pattern of abababab and the Strambotto Romagnuolo carries a rhyme scheme of ababccdd.
My thanks to PoetryMagnumOpus
Strambotto (Sicilian)
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
Hendecasyllabic lines rhymed abababab. Usually is lyrical and sentimental or amorous.
Origin:
Sicily
Schematic:
Rhyme: abababab
Meter: xxxxxxxxxxx
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
8
See Also:
Status:
Incomplete
Strambotto (Tuscan)
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
Stanzas of 6 or 8 hendecasyllabic lines rhymed ababccdd (preferred), abababcc, aabbccdd, ababcc, ababab, or aabbcc. Usually is lyrical and sentimental or amorous.
Origin:
Italian
Schematic:
Rhyme:
ababccdd (preferred),
abababcc,
aabbccdd,
ababcc,
ababab, or
aabbcc
Meter: xxxxxxxxxxx
See Also:
My thanks to Poetry Base.
Example Poem
This Drink’s on Me, Err… You (Strambotto)
While I drank sociably, the crowd grew pressing
I’d come because the band was recommended.
Folks were rowdy, unfriendly, rude, depressing.
A girl approached, her lovely hand extended
“May I have your stool to sit next to my sis?”?
“Sure.?” I’d been taught manners are not hit or miss.
Her “sis” rose, gave seat to girl’s male friend (I think.)
When they danced I spilled upon their stools, my drink.
© Lawrencealot – December 12, 2013
VISUAL TEMPLATES. These show the rhyme patterns and syllable count.
                                      No specfic meter is mandated, I have shown both
                                      iambic and trochaic possibilities.

Ochtfochlach

The ochtfochlach is an Irish verse formof 8 lines with a consistent but unspecified length and meter. The rhyme scheme is aaab cccb. (aaabcccb)
The Ochtfochlach
I like the form and rhythm, too;
It fits and wears like well-made shoe.
With luck it lasts a whole life through
And looks no worse for wear.
Iambic feet can march along
And lend their cadence to a song
With beats that switch from soft to strong,
A pace that’s light to bear.
My example poem
Fochlach It   (Ochtfochlach)
The Ochtingfochlach rocks
it’s not some damn flummox;
I penned this wearing socks,
and yes, without my shoes.
Define most any style
this form will soon beguile
and render forth a smile.
So what is there to lose?
© Lawrencealot – December 4, 2013
Visual Template
There is no requirement for meter or line-length, though I chose iambic trimeter for this write.

Leigh Hunt Rondeau

An poem of 8 lines with the  final line being only four syllables
Simply Trochaic Tetrameter, with catalectic feet providing the bold rhyme
Rhyme pattern:  (Da)babcdcD
Syllabic: 8/8/8/8/8/8/8/4
Refrain: The capital D, represents the first half of line 1.

Visual Template

Amanda's Pinch poetry form

 Created by  Amanda J. Norton, Oct. 18, 2013 on Allpoety
This is a syllabic form with syllable count 12/12/10/8/8/10/12/12
with Rhyme Scheme abcDDcba, (with line 5 a refrain of line 4)
Alliteration is required in every line.
It looks well centered.
Its structure giving the impression of being gently pinched together,
then springing back in a mirror image.
It may be doubled.
Sample Poem
Unhooked Hook-up     (Amanda’s Pinch)
Two sailors seeking girls inclined to kiss and pet;
I kissed my choice until my lips looked botox filled.
My girl had double D’s that suited well
until I bumbled with the bra!
Until I bumbled with the bra
my every effort seemed to work out swell.
She was prob’ly put off that I was so unskilled.
That was an undone date that I just can’t forget.
© Lawrencealot – October 24,2013
Visual Template

Coraline poetry form

This is a form invented by Allpoetry’s Lisa Morris , aka Streambed

It is a modified Italian Octave  with the following specifications. 

The lines are octasyllabic, to be written preferable in iambic tetrameter,

but trochaic tetrameter may be used at the poet’s discretion.

 A poem consists of exactly two  stanzas, each being an octave. (2 octaves)

The rhyme scheme is: abbaccab

 

Example poem
Revised (Coraline)
For years and years I loved one wife
whose sensuality evoked
desire in every word she spoke.
I thought I’d married her for life.
My work demanded much of me
were I to climb the corporate tree;
she coped with kids and household strife
and felt her passion’d been revoked.
So she revoked our marriage vow-
became a vamp and able tease,
and found more men than me to please.
I offered work to disavow,
to change so she would stay with me;
but she enjoyed then being free.
The gloomy skies have brightened now,
a pampered wife sets me at ease.
© Lawrencealot – September 18, 2013
Visual Template (for iambic tetrameter)

Amphibrach Trimeter

The amphibrach is a trisyllabic metrical foot, which in accentual meter consists of an accented syllable between two unaccented syllables.
Rhyme optional
Isosyllabic 9 syllables
A single octave.  (8 lines)
Example Poem
Bird Watching
Reclining relaxed in the garden
the cat was ignoring my  calling,
indifferently birds kept on chirping,
idyllic conditions for poets.
Amusing deception, cat lazy
and silent just waiting for breakfast.
Indolent or working at trapping
a birdie who thinks that he’s sleeping?
I’ll leave now before I spoil something.
© Lawrencealot – May 5, 2012
Visual Template

Double Swap Octet

This form was invented by D.D.Michaels writing at Allpoetry.com.
  1. Begin with any octet with any rhyme scheme and meter. 
  2. Break lines 1 and 4 into segments which can be broken in concert with that rhyme scheme.
  3. Swap Line 1 to Line eight, after reversing those aforementioned sections
  4. Swap Line 4 to Line seven in the same manner.
Example Poem
Written in iambic pentameter with rhyme scheme: ababcdcd, 
where refrain words represent half a line.
Let’s Write a Double Swap Octet
A double swap octet let us now pen.
I built the first with one swap, not too bright.
So I am back right now to try again.
It helps if your instructor  gets it right.
Pen line four right after one, prevent yelps
from finding it won’t rhyme the way it’s set.
If your instructor gets it right it helps.
Let us now pen a double swap octet.
By just lines one and four,  all rhymes are set.
I’ve set those words in red to ring like chimes.
Now you write wonderfully, without regret.
At the end or at the break, place the rhymes.
Remember line sequence for heaven’s sake.
Then unlike me, you won’t louse up the score.
Place the rhymes at the end, or at the break.
All rhymes are set by just lines one and four.
© Lawrencealot  –  May 3, 2012
Visual Template

Huitain

Huitain

Type:

Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Isosyllabic, Simple

Description:

A complete poem composed of one ballade stanza: eight or ten-syllable isosyllabic lines rhyming ababbcbc.

Also known as the Monk’s Tale Stanza.

Origin:

French

Schematic:

ababbcbc

Rhythm/Stanza Length:

8

Line/Poem Length:

8

Pasted from <http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/145.shtml>

My Thanks to Charles Weatherford for the fine resource above.

  • Huitain, is an octastich, a poem in 8 lines. It is made up of a single Ballade stanza without an envoy. The verse form was most popular in the 16th century and was often used for epigrams in the 18th century. One source suggests the Hutain may have begun in Spain with the simple 8 syllable by 8 line frame which is typical of early Spanish verse. Which came first and who influenced who, who knows. The French were sometimes known to use the frame for a collaborative poem between 2 or more poets. Each poet contributing a hutain around a central theme.The Huitain is an octastich written in octasyllabic lines, the most common rhyme scheme ababbcbc.

 

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=690#huitain>

 My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine resource above.
The true Huitain is a single verse, eight line poem with eight syllables per line.
The French form began as the Spanish with eight lines of eight syllables, but it also allowed for the continuation of the poem in additional eight line stanzas. It was even accepted as a form of collaborative poetry with several poets each contributing their own eight line stanza.
The English, with their fondness for iambic pentameter, also accepted ten syllable lines, but to me this strays too far from the original intent of the form. Myself, I stuck to the original, Spanish rules. My example is eight lines of eight syllables each. 🙂

Various rhyme schemes that have been accepted:
French/English #1: ababbcbc
French/English #2: abbaacac
Spanish #1: ababacac
Spanish #2: abbaacca 
Example Poem
Today’s Press Too (Huitan – French/English # 2)
“First get your facts said young Mark Twain,
then …distort them as you (may) please,”
an editorial newsprint tease.
The politicians all do feign
to patiently their points explain,
but facts seem bothersome at best,
when asked details they will abstain.
They give just “views” then let you guess.
Lawrencealot – November 12, 2012
Visual Template

McWhirtle

A McWhirtle is a light verse form similar to a double dactyl, invented in 1989 by American poet Bruce Newling. McWhirtles share essentially the same form as double dactyls, but without the strict requirements, making them easier to write. Specifically:
• McWhirtles do not require a nonsense phrase (e.g., “Higgledy piggledy”) on the first line.
• There is no requirement for a double-dactylic word in the second stanza.
• There is an extra unstressed syllable added to the beginning of the first line of each stanza.
• Although the meter is the same as in a double-dactyl, syllables may move from the end of one line to the beginning of the next for readability.
The looser form allows poets additional freedom to include additional rhymes and other stylistic devices.
The form is named after the fictional protagonist in an early example by Newling, included with his original written description of the form, dated August 12, 1989; but his first McWhirtle, in which his friend “Skip” Ungar is the protagonist and which also appeared with his original description, was:
The Piano Player
I read in the papers
That Harry F. Ungar
Performs in a night spot
Near soigne Scotch Plains,
Caressing the keyboard
While affluent yuppies
Are eating and drinking
Their capital gains.
The first published description of the McWhirtle, with examples, was in E.O. Parrott, ed., How to Be Well-Versed in Poetry, London: Viking, 1990, pp. 197-200; and the verse form was also described in Anne H. Soukhanov, Word Watch – The Stories Behind the Words of Our Lives, New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1995, pp. 388-89.
An example by American poet Kenn Nesbitt:
Fernando the Fearless
We’re truly in awe of
Fernando the Fearless
who needed no net
for the flying trapeze.
Alas, what a shame
it’s surprisingly difficult
catching a bar
in the midst of a sneeze.
Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McWhirtle>
 
Sample poem
Wake-Up, It’s Not Suzie
When waking up drunken
Sometimes I have thunken
how far I have sunken
in shame? Who’s the dame
in this bed?  If I open
my eyes and then hope I
have not, that I’m coping
with dreams, is that lame?
(c) Lawrencealot – July 8, 201
Visual Example
Note: only the 4th and 8th line rhyme are required.