Cyclone

This form is a Cyclone invented by Sector-Hunter
*A cyclone is a poem that wraps around to form a loop it is made of 10 stanzas where the last 3 say what the first 3 said* (44 lines)
*1. The first three stanzas are in lines of 4 with a syllable count of 4,5,6,7*
*2. The next 4 stanzas are in lines of 5 with a count of 4,5,6,7,8 and lead up to the last three stanzas with a word or the whole line that will flow into the last 3 and cause the poem to loop *
*3. The last 3 stanzas are also in lines of 4 and the same count as the first 3 and they have to say the same thing as the first three stanzas*
There is no meter requirement;  the illustrated poems shows the sample rhyme pattern,
But the author states rhyme optional.
Example Poem

Write a Cyclone
Write a cyclone.
It’s not tough to do.
Count syllables alone.
Just make sure your count is true.
Use couplet rhyme
masculine or not.
No rhyme at any time
Is okay, so take a shot.
Inventor says
no meter required
so without rhyme this lays
pretty barren, uninspired.
Right here we change
from quatrain stanzas
to quintets giving range
for more verbal bonanzas.
Pen something serious or strange.
Since we are free
for practically all
lengths of words can now be
combined somewhere; have a ball!
Use complicated words with glee.
It’s fun to slip
into playful mode.
Like hearing water drip.
Dripping splish, splash the whole load-
let onomatopoeia rip.
I’ve had some fun,
joshed and played around.
End with what has begun
That makes the poem fly I’ve found.
So when I pen this line, I’m done.
Write a cyclone.
It’s not tough to do.
Count syllables alone.
Just make sure your count is true.
Use couplet rhyme
masculine or not.
No rhyme at any time
Is okay, so take a shot.
Inventor says
no meter required
so without rhyme this lays
pretty barren, uninspired.
© Lawrencealot – July 12, 2012

Visual Template

Partenza Represa

The Partenza Represa created by: Dawn Slanker
It contains any number of four line stanzas which can rhyme or not rhyme
depending on preference. The most important features of this form are that
it maintains strict syllable line count of your choosing:
8*6*8*6, 8*8*8*8, 10*10*10*10, etc…and that each line must begin
(anywhere you like) with the last portion of the preceding line.
Also, it’s important to point out that you have the option of either
continuing the first line of each stanza with a refrain from the line
preceding it or you may choose to begin an entirely new line for each stanza.
IMHO that makes this one of the most versatile forms I have yet addressed:
Any meter, any line length, any or no rhyme, word refrains
Example Poem
They Fart Melodies
Some folks believe their shit don’t stink.
Their shit don’t  stink, some people think.
Some people think, It seems to  me,
It seems to me- You may agree.
Suggest they’ve faltered and you’ll see.
You’ll see amazment- “What?  Not me!
Not me, the fault is in your view.
Your  view if critical– untrue!”
Their poop’s foil-wrapped, it has no smell.
It has no smell, a fool can tell.
A  fool can tell they’re always right.
They’re always right; therein’s our plight.
Fawn, applaud, and give them respect.
Respect even what’s not correct.
Correct them once and you’ll be banned.
You’ll be banned: You don’t understand
© Lawrencealot – April 30, 2012
Example visual template
Partenza Represa

Pleiades

Pleiades form

This titled form was invented in 1999 by Craig Tigerman, Sol Magazine’s Lead Editor.
Only one word is allowed in the title followed by a single seven-line stanza.

The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title.

Hortensia Anderson, a popular haiku and tanka poet, added her
own requirement of restricting the line length to six syllables.

 

 Example Poem

Storm
Striking frightful lightning
Sending shadows darting
Sudden squall surprising
Shrieking wind propelling
Screams against our faces,
Slamming hail bombarding –
Suddenly it’s over.
© Lawrencealot – April 16, 2012

Visual Template:
This was penned in trochaic trimeter, but that is not a requirement.
Pleiades

 

Trimeric

Trimeric tri-(meh)-rik n: a four stanza poem in which the first stanza has four lines
and the last three stanzas have three lines each, with the first line of each repeating
the respective line of the first stanza.
The sequence of lines, then, is abcd, b – -, c – -, d – -.
There is no line length, meter, or rhyme requirement or prohibition.
Example Poem
Whisky Works
He zig-zagged up the steep hill
much too drunk to walk a line.
Winter weather laid down a chill
with ice on that steep incline.
Much too drunk to walk a line
he headed home, had time still.
Unless he fell he’d be fine.
Winter weather laid down a chill
as he staggered up the hill.
He’d make it;  he had the will.
With ice on that steep incline
(he had lots of time to kill)
his anti-freeze worked just fine.
© Lawrencealot – April 29, 2012

Wreath

A Wreath Poem is:
 Any poem which is constructed with or without  rhyme or fixed meter in which every line in to poem is linked to the line preceding it a word or by derivation of  a word  in the preceding line or by a homonym of that word,  or apparently by a derivative of a false rhyme of that word.
They are fun to read, AND write.
Example Poem:
Glued Wreath
I started this poem no topic defined.
Definitely sure something would occur.
Would you believe it? Still I cannot find
a foundation for words which I prefer.
The witch of sticky mucilage has stuck
My muse at large with two wheels off the track.
The traction needed now may call for luck.
Lucky I have been, I just came unstuck.
© Lawrencealot – May 2, 2012