Triolet

A Triolet is a poetic form consisting of only 8 lines.           
Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and  7th lines          
repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well.           
The rhyme scheme is simple:  ABaAabAB, capital          
letters representing the repeated lines.    
 
There is no set syllable count, although the preferred one for repeating forms is the standard of eight syllables but there are many good examples around using iambic pentameter and similar meters.
Example Poem:
Pug Peed Too     (Triolet)
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I watched for cops, Pug just lifted his leg.
I’m glad Ms. Klag, the nag, saw him not me.
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I’ll merely bail him out and set him free.
and remember my next Pug should be Peg.
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I watched for cops, Pug just lifted his leg.
 
(c) Lawrencealot –  June, 2012
 
Picture Credit:  www.pinterest.com
 
 
Visual Template
 
 

Triquatrain

The form name “Triquatrain” was most likely contrived by Robert L. Huntsman as found listed on shadowpoetry.com. However he most likely stole the credit by giving a name to simple didactic verse. 
This is obvious because “Jack and Jill” was written in the 1760s.
There is also reference to it in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the end of act three: “Jack shall have Jill; Nought shall go ill.”  (Just a little history there) 
It is a quatrain poem in tri-rhyme with a specific rhyming pattern (see below). 
Lines 1 and 3 have internal rhyme whereas lines 2 and 4 do not. 
Rhyme Pattern:
(a,a)
(c,c)
(d,d)
(f,f)
e
(g,g) 
(i,i)
h
Example Poem:
 
Fred Meets Trixie
Now Fred was nice; he worked in vice
and could not be corrupt.
Take the money, have a honey.
He made them all shut-up.
He closed down rooms that reeked of fumes,
that turned out to be meth.
He smashed their tools, then told the fools,
“Wages of sin are death.”
Prostitution?  His solution:
Arrest each whore and John.
So straight he played, that I’m afraid.
Some councilmen are gone.
Some lovely chicks had turned some dicks,
(Detectives),  I should say.
But, no cutie, or real beauty
Could cause our Fred to sway.
Business was down all over town,
confession booths were slow.
The internet was busy yet
it brought no local dough.
Then just by chance one day Fred glanced
across the cafe floor.
As Trixie came (the perfect dame)
right through the joint’s front door.
Passions promised in some fashion
many times thru the years,
It seems  absurd without a word
said,  she had meshed his gears!
After they talked, together walked,
She put him to the test.
“Play on my range,” she said,” for change
is as good as arrest.”
 
 
Visual Template

Trois-par-Huit

The Trois-par-Huit is a short eight line poetic form that is striking and fun to play with.
This form was created by Lorraine M. Kanter
and goes by a few other names as well, the Octa tri and the Three by Eight just to name a couple.
The structure of the Trois-par Huit is easy to compose as it only has three stanzas of 3,3,2 or 3,2,3, lines which can be decided on your own personal taste.
As with many forms the Trois-par-Huit has a syllable count: 3/6/9/12/12/9/6/3.
Rhyme scheme: aabbbccc.
The last line of the poem should be the title of the piece
and should summarize what the poem is about.
Example Poem:
Finish Forms
Quench my thirst.
The unknown  is the curse.
I must scour pages of AP sages
Find their every form though it may take me ages.
Then if they keep inventing… put  them in cages.
In cases where changes come in swarms
document  all the norms.
Finish forms.
© Lawrencealot – April 21, 2012

Tyburn

A six line poem consisting of 2/2/2/2/9/9  syllables.
The first four lines rhyme and are all descriptive words.
The last two lines rhyme and incorporate the first, second, third, and fourth lines as 4 syllables
Rhyme Scheme:  xxxxaa
Example Poem:
Campus Choices
Brashest                                                        
Dullest
Dearest
Cutest
The brashest, dullest jock, slow to start
Found the dearest, cutest, girls too smart.

Villanelle

Villanelles are required to have an intricate rhyme scheme and two lines that are refrains – like refrains in songs, they get repeated over and over.
The rhyme scheme is AbA’abAabA’abAabA’abAA’, so there are only two rhymes that end all the lines.
In addition, the first line and third line, the refrains, are repeated four times each –
the first line appears at the end of stanzas 2 and 4 and as the second-to-last line in stanza 6.
The poem’s third line appears again at the end of stanzas 3, 5, and 6.
So if we call the first line A and the third line A’, and any line that rhymes with them a,
then the rhyme scheme is: AbA’ abA abA’ abA abA’ abAA’
Example Poem:
Sensuality’s Source
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
Thus age is harmless to this wife of mine.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.
Desire for one another will invent
Innumerable paths leading to cloud nine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
Performance, age related, has been bent
by years;  her voice and touch revokes decline.
A tease fulfilled,  assures a mates ascent.
A failure now and then she’ll not  resent
If he in other ways her wants enshrine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
Endearments overshadow the event
and fill two hearts most willing to entwine.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.
Today’s youth may not know how much is meant
by such commitment.  Love makes all things fine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.
© Lawrencealot – March, 2012
Visual Template:

Whyquain

A form invented on AllPoetry.com by Gloria Kim, aka Porphery. 
It is a single verse of five iambic tetrameter lines in monorhyme
which answers some asked or un-asked question.
 
Example Poem:
 
Why Do Cats Purr
 
While dogs can bark and growl and grrrr
and guard, and stealthy thieves deter,
which earned their place with men for sure,
The cats had only pretty fur,
so asked if God would add a purr.
Visual Template

Ya Hoo

The Ya Hoo is an enhanced version of the Yadu.
It was invented by Lawrencelot of AP
There are 1 to 3 stanzas, each with five lines.
Each of the first four lines have four syllables.
The last line has either 5, 7, 9 or 11 syllables.
The defining feature of this form is that it has internal staircase rhyme, as does the yadu, but unlike the yadu it has right and left staircases.
Also unlike the yadu, there is NO requirement that the poem have a theme about seasons.
Here is a syllable schematic of the rhyme required.
a.O.O.b
O.a.b.c
d.b.a.e
O.d.e.c
O.e.d.c
Where “–” equals from 1 to 7 syllables.
Related forms:  Than-BaukThan-Bauk PoemYaDu,  Ya Hoo.
Example poem.
Maybe Time, by Lawrencealot
Shine a dim light
of fine nightowl
sky;  white wine pour
for my poorgal. 
She’s sore. Why? I dunno but I see a scowl.
I could propose
then I ‘spose she
would close my night
out good, right?We
don’t fight. Should work for everybody.
Visual Template:

ZaniLa Rhyme

The ZaniLa Rhyme is a poetry form created by Laura Lamarca.
A ZaniLa Rhyme has an minimum of three quatrain stanzas with a specific rhyme scheme and syllable count.
There is no maximum length requirement for the form.
In each stanza, the rhyme scheme is abcb 
and the syllable count is 9/7/9/9.
Along with the end-line rhyme scheme, the ZaniLa Rhyme
also has an internal rhyme in line 3 of each stanza.
Line 3 repeats in all odd-numbered stanzas, as written in stanza one.
In all even-numbered stanzas, line 3 repeats
but the order of the line is reversed.
Example Poem:
Right ZaniLa Wrong   ( ZaniLa Rhyme )
ZaniLa threw me a couple times
So I’ll write another one.
Internal rhyme in this line this time
to illustrate how it should be done.
I had a d-rhyme within my rhymes
and of d’s there should be none.
In this line this time- internal rhyme
in reversed order from when begun.
I can toot the horns and ring the chimes
for I’ve got the battle won.
Internal rhyme in this line this time.
Finally my errors are undone.
     © Lawrencealot – December 30, 2012
 
Visual Template: